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Archive for July 9th, 2015

oskar eli

By Stephen Mullen

Adolescence can be a terrible time. It can be very painful. It is a time when you lose yourself, lose what you have been, and become a new person in spite of yourself. For most of us, this happens surrounded by others going through the same thing at the same time – is it any wonder how horribly 12 and 13 year olds can treat one another? Let the Right One In is a vampire movie, and a bit of a social satire (if that’s the word) – but mostly, it is about that time when you stop being a child and start to become something else (not quite an adult – but not a child). It is about loss – the loss of childhood, of identity, though also other losses (losing connections with other people, through death or changes in you and them) – but also about what you become. Change is loss, but also gain – you lose who you were, you become someone new. It is about the effects of these changes on groups of kids – about their cruelty, their pain, about how they cope, and perhaps escape.

The main story is about Oskar, a 12 year old living in a particularly horrifying suburb of Stockholm in 1981 (a period promising transition itself – Brezhnev was on his last legs; Reagan was rattling sabers across the sea – the Cold War itself was starting to change, but it wasn’t sure what it was going to change into, and Sweden was right there between the two of them). Oskar lives with his mother, who is seldom home; his father lives in the country and is something of a refuge for the boy (except when he’s drinking). He goes to school, where he is too clever for his own good, with an excessive interest in police matters; his classmates torment him mercilessly, and he goes home and imagines bloody vengeance on them. There don’t seem to be any other kids in his apartment complex; then one moves in – Eli, a strange girl about his age who doesn’t seem to dress appropriately for the cold, who seems about as lonely and suspicious as Oskar. It doesn’t take them long to become friends – they bond over a Rubik’s cube, and they are soon very close. (more…)

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