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Archive for the ‘author Marco Tremble’ Category

by Marco Tremble

Australia; Directed by George Miller; Starring: – Mel Gibson, Joanne Samuel, Steve Bisley, Roger Ward, Hugh Keys-Byrne, Vincent Gill and Geoff Parry.

Mad Max is the underrated phenomenon that started a genre, the first mainstream dystopian fall of society. Set in an Australia with its society on the brink of collapse, terrorized by scores of nomadic biker gangs who have little or no regard human life and policed by young men who have little or no hope of turning the tide yet still they try.

Its here we find Max (an early role for troubled megastar Mel Gibson), involved in the pursuit of a cop-killer called The Nightrider (Vincent Gill). Miller doesn’t actually start the action with our protagonist but rather his colleagues Roop and Charlie.

Roop, indulging his voyeuristic habits through the scope of sniper rifle is called to a hot pursuit of the cop killer whose “wasted a young probie” and stolen one of the Main Force Patrol’s or MFP’s prized cars a pursuit special.  This is where the chase begins, the boys in their super hot, souped up pursuit and interceptor vehicles chase down the Nightrider as he psychotically pontificates over the radio at “The Bronze” as he calls them.

The driving and the action is frenetic and violent and eventually entwines Max’s best friend, the motorcycle cop Jim Goose (Steve Bisley), who after several more accidents low-sides his bike and break’s his leg… Enter Max, we have seen him in brief cut scenes working on his interceptor, but now he enters his own, called by “The Goose” into the pursuit Max plays a high octane, high horsepower game of chicken. This as all games of chicken do ends badly, for The Nightrider that is and so begins our story.

Essentially we have two tales of revenge in this movie; first we have the maniacal Toecutter (Hugh Keys-Byrne) and his gang seeking revenge on Max and his friends and family. It’s this sadistic and prolonged revenge when punctuated by the murder of Goose and Max’s wife and son that sends Max mad. (more…)

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by Marco Tremble

with Min-Sik Choi, Byung-Hun Lee; directed by Jee-Woon Kim’ running time 144 min.

I Saw the Devil is what can be only described as one of the most extreme revenge thrillers I’ve seen.  It all starts on a dark snow night with a lone young woman stuck in a car on the phone to her fiancé…

Normal enough you might think? But a school bus that drives past has what can only be one of the most demented villains I’ve come across. He really does make Hannibal Lecter look like a day care assistant! Still no shocks yet, the conversation between the happy couple continues as the driver of the bus surveys the car and eventually asks if she wants help with her flat tire.

It still seems all innocent just now as the girl declines his offer of help and finishes her call with her finance that is I forgot to say an agent with South Korea’s Military Intelligence Agency.  This begins to set up everything for the rest of the movie as once the call is finished the man in the bus attacks the car and the girl in the most brutal fashion with a very heavy hammer…

The scene cuts to what can only be described as a torture chamber where the killer begins his murderous act that eventually kicks the movie off. I’m not going to go in to the “gory” details only to say there is the usual pleading for life which is ignored and the revelation that his victim is pregnant all to no avail as the girl is dispatched and disposed of.

Then segue to a scene of a child walking through a field by a stream beneath a motorway overpass, the child beating the grass with a stick and eventually finding a black plastic bag. This kicks off the discovery of the victims many body parts and starts what can only be described as the most sadistic hunt for revenge. (more…)

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brides-1

by Marco Tremble

Brides was Hammer’s follow up to the original adaptation of Bram Stoker’s vampire tale and unfortunately did not star Christopher Lee in his signature role as he was afraid of being typecast (never!!!).   Instead the bloodthirsty aristocrat was played by another British actor David Peel in his only silver screen outing providing a passable performance as the monster of the piece but never equaling Lee at his height.   Carrying on the Hammer tradition and reprising his role as the nemesis of all bloodsuckers was Peter Cushing as Van Helsing (not be confused with the mistake that Stephen Sommers made, entertaining though it was), ably supported by veteran British actresses Martita Hunt and Freda Jackson.  Also supporting Mr. Cushing was the lovely French Actress Yvonne Monlaur as the unlucky victim of the desires of Baron Meinster.   (more…)

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by Marco Tremble

Another of Hammer’s firsts was it’s 1968 feature The Plague of Zombies, their one and only film to deal with these creatures immortalised by another horror maestro George A. Romero in his ongoing and often badly copied Living Dead saga.   Originally issued as the “B-Feature” to one of their other better known 1965 efforts Dracula Prince of Darkness and having no recognisable star, this film is superior in every way. Directed by John Gilling who was responsible for the other Hammers The Reptile, which was incidentally filmed back to back and used some of the same sets as The Plague of Zombies and another of Hammer’s Mummy saga The Mummy’s Shroud, and some of the classic 60’s TV shows The Saint and The Champions.  

Starring Andre Morell, Watson to Cushing’s Holmes in The Hound of the Baskervilles, Brook Williams the ill fated Sgt Harris from Where Eagles Dare and Jacqueline Pearce, better known to British viewers for her ongoing role of Servelan in the long running British Science Fiction series Blake’s 7 and Hammer perennial Michael Ripper. The villain of the piece is provided by John Carson, a veteran of British television who also starred in one of the later Hammer offerings Captain Kronos: Vampire Killer.   (more…)

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Something very wicked this way comes - form a circle!

Something very wicked this way comes - form a circle!

by Marco Tremble

This film was the first of Hammer’s two Dennis Wheatley adaptations and also has another important first for a Hammer movie. It is the first and only Hammer where regular leading man Christopher Lee plays the hero in the form of the Duc de Richleau, ex-world war one fighter pilot and and expert on the occult.   In this foray into the darkness Mr. Lee is accompanied by another British leading man more known for his singing voice than his horror roles, Leon Greene better known to fans of “Comedy Tonight” as Miles Gloriosus from A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum. As well as a very young Patrick Mower and Paul Eddington who is better known for his roles in The Good Life and Yes Minister on TV.   (more…)

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